Opting out among women with elite education

@article{Hersch2013OptingOA,
  title={Opting out among women with elite education},
  author={Joni Hersch},
  journal={Review of Economics of the Household},
  year={2013},
  volume={11},
  pages={469-506}
}
  • J. Hersch
  • Published 24 April 2013
  • Economics, Education
  • Review of Economics of the Household
Whether highly educated women are exiting the labor force to care for their children has generated a great deal of media attention, even though academic studies find little evidence of opting out. This paper shows that female graduates of elite institutions have lower labor market involvement than their counterparts from less selective institutions. Although elite graduates are more likely to earn advanced degrees, marry at later ages, and have higher expected earnings, there is little… 

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