Optimal sensor location for body sensor network to detect self-stimulatory behaviors of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Abstract

In this study, we investigate various locations of sensor positions to detect stereotypical self-stimulatory behavioral patterns of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The study is focused on finding optimal detection performance based on sensor location and number of sensors. To perform this study, we developed a wearable sensor system that uses a 3 axis accelerometer. A microphone was used to understand the surrounding environment and video provided ground truth for analysis. The recordings were done on 2 children diagnosed with ASD who showed repeated self-stimulatory behaviors that involve part of the body such as flapping arms, body rocking and vocalization of non-word sounds. We used time-frequency methods to extract features and sparse signal representation methods to design over-complete dictionary for data analysis, detection and classification of these ASD behavioral events. We show that using single sensor on the back achieves 95.5% classification rate for rocking and 80.5% for flapping. In contrast, flapping events can be recognized with 86.5% accuracy using wrist worn sensors.

DOI: 10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5334572

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Cite this paper

@article{Min2009OptimalSL, title={Optimal sensor location for body sensor network to detect self-stimulatory behaviors of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.}, author={Cheol-Hong Min and Ahmed H. Tewfik and Youngchun Kim and Rigel Menard}, journal={Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Annual Conference}, year={2009}, volume={2009}, pages={3489-92} }