Optimal diet theory: when does it work, and when and why does it fail?

@article{Sih2001OptimalDT,
  title={Optimal diet theory: when does it work, and when and why does it fail?},
  author={Andrew Sih and Bent Christensen},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2001},
  volume={61},
  pages={379-390}
}
Over the last three decades, many studies have attempted to explain forager diets by using optimal diet theory (ODT. [] Key Result Our major conclusion is that while ODT has generally worked well for foragers that feed on immobile prey, the theory often failed to predict the diets of foragers that attack mobile prey. We found only mixed support for the hypothesis that the theory works better when the study scenario more closely fits the assumptions of the model.

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