Optical and photoreceptor immaturities limit the spatial and chromatic vision of human neonates.

@article{Banks1988OpticalAP,
  title={Optical and photoreceptor immaturities limit the spatial and chromatic vision of human neonates.},
  author={Martin S. Banks and Patrick J. Bennett},
  journal={Journal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics and image science},
  year={1988},
  volume={5 12},
  pages={
          2059-79
        }
}
  • M. BanksP. Bennett
  • Published 1 December 1988
  • Physics
  • Journal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics and image science
We examine the contributions of preneural mechanisms, i.e., the optics of the eye and the aperture, spacing, and efficiency of foveal cones, to poor spatial and chromatic vision in human neonates. We do so by comparing the performances of ideal observers incorporating the characteristics of the optics and the foveal cones of adults and neonates. Our analyses show that many, but not all, of the differences between neonatal and adult contrast sensitivities and grating acuities can be explained by… 

Use of an early nonlinearity to measure optical and receptor resolution in the human neonate

Retinal illuminance and contrast sensitivity in human infants

PII: S0042-6989(98)00080-7

Comparisons of ideal and real sensitivity indicate that optical and receptoral immaturities impose a significant constraint on neonatal contrast sensitivity and acuity, but thatimmaturities in later processing stages must also limit visual performance.

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The aim of this work was to measure the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for visual spatial frequencies, ranging between 0.25 and 2 cpd, in children (4, 5, 6 and 7 years old) and adults. The
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