Opioid receptor blockade reduces maternal affect and social grooming in rhesus monkeys

@article{Martel1993OpioidRB,
  title={Opioid receptor blockade reduces maternal affect and social grooming in rhesus monkeys},
  author={F. L. Martel and C. Nevison and F. Rayment and M. Simpson and E. Keverne},
  journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology},
  year={1993},
  volume={18},
  pages={307-321}
}
Seven lactating female rhesus macaques, housed in social groups, were administered with low doses (0.5 mg/kg) of the opioid antagonist naloxone when their infants were 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks old. A control group received saline. Mothers receiving naloxone were involved in less grooming with other group members, and were less protective towards their infants. By infant-age week 8 they also groomed their infants less, while other monkeys groomed the infants more. Other behavioural measures of… Expand
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