Opioid antagonists in the treatment of alcohol dependence: clinical efficacy and prevention of relapse.

@article{OMalley1996OpioidAI,
  title={Opioid antagonists in the treatment of alcohol dependence: clinical efficacy and prevention of relapse.},
  author={Stephanie S O'Malley},
  journal={Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire). Supplement},
  year={1996},
  volume={31 1},
  pages={
          77-81
        }
}
  • S. O'Malley
  • Published 1996
  • Medicine
  • Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire). Supplement
Placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that patients treated with opioid antagonists had fewer drinking days, lower rates of resumed heavy drinking, and reduced alcohol craving, when compared with placebo-treated patients. Patients who received an opioid antagonist were also less likely to drink heavily if they sampled alcohol during treatment. One study also demonstrated that patients who were treated with the opioid antagonist naltrexone had lower serum aspartate aminotransferase and… Expand
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