Opinion: Adaptations to energy stress dictate the ecology and evolution of the Archaea

@article{Valentine2007OpinionAT,
  title={Opinion: Adaptations to energy stress dictate the ecology and evolution of the Archaea},
  author={David L. Valentine},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={5},
  pages={316-323}
}
  • D. Valentine
  • Published 1 April 2007
  • Biology
  • Nature Reviews Microbiology
The three domains of life on Earth include the two prokaryotic groups, Archaea and Bacteria. The Archaea are distinguished from Bacteriabased on phylogenetic and biochemical differences, but currently there is no unifying ecological principle to differentiate these groups. The ecology of the Archaea is reviewed here in terms of cellular bioenergetics. Adaptation to chronic energy stress is hypothesized to be the crucial factor that distinguishes the Archaea from Bacteria. The biochemical… 

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