Open Labware: 3-D Printing Your Own Lab Equipment

@article{Baden2015OpenL3,
  title={Open Labware: 3-D Printing Your Own Lab Equipment},
  author={Tom Baden and Andr{\'e} Maia Chagas and Greg Gage and Timothy C. Marzullo and Lucia L. Prieto-Godino and Thomas Euler},
  journal={PLoS Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={13}
}
The introduction of affordable, consumer-oriented 3-D printers is a milestone in the current “maker movement,” which has been heralded as the next industrial revolution. Combined with free and open sharing of detailed design blueprints and accessible development tools, rapid prototypes of complex products can now be assembled in one’s own garage—a game-changer reminiscent of the early days of personal computing. At the same time, 3-D printing has also allowed the scientific and engineering… Expand

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper

Open Design 3D-Printable Adjustable Micropipette that Meets the ISO Standard for Accuracy
TLDR
This work presents a design of a micropipette that is assembled from 3D-printable parts and some hardware that works by actuating a disposable syringe to a user-adjustable limit and meets the ISO 8655 standards. Expand
Open Design 3D-Printable Adjustable Micropipette that meets ISO Standard for Accuracy
TLDR
This work presents a design of a micropipette that is assembled from 3D-printable parts and some hardware that works by actuating a disposable syringe to a user adjustable limit and meets ISO 8655 standards. Expand
Open source 3-D printed nutating mixer
As the open source development of additive manufacturing has led to low-cost desktop three-dimensional (3-D) printing, a number of scientists throughout the world have begun to share digital designsExpand
Using Open-Source, 3D Printable Optical Hardware To Enhance Student Learning in the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is a technology with near-unlimited potential for the chemical educator. However, its adoption into higher education has been limited by the dual requirements ofExpand
FINDUS: An Open-Source 3D Printable Liquid-Handling Workstation for Laboratory Automation in Life Sciences
TLDR
The construction, calibration, and usage of the FINDUS (Fully Integrable Noncommercial Dispensing Utility System) are described and all 3D models, assembly instructions, and source code are made available for free download, rebuild, and modification. Expand
Open-Source 3-D Platform for Low-Cost Scientific Instrument Ecosystem
TLDR
An automated low-cost 3-D motion control platform is presented that has the capacity to perform scientific applications, including 3D printing of scientific hardware, and the creation of a diverse array of custom instruments that can be shared and replicated digitally throughout the world. Expand
Open source 3D printers: an appropriate technology for building low cost optics labs for the developing communities
The recent introduction of RepRap (self-replicating rapid prototyper) 3-D printers and the resultant open source technological improvements have resulted in affordable 3-D printing, enabling low-costExpand
Design and Implementation of Three-Dimensional Printable Optomechanical Components
TLDR
It is demonstrated that optical systems built using 3D printable optomechanical components are comparable to their more expensive, commercially available counterparts, albeit not as durable as commercial parts. Expand
3D printable optomechanical cage system with enclosure
TLDR
This work seeks to incorporate the relatively new field of 3D printing into the design and “at-home” manufacture of optomechanical equipment for open-space spectroscopy by designing and manufacturing an optical cage system that is printable on any entry-level commercially available 3D printer. Expand
Three hundred and sixty degree real-time monitoring of 3-D printing using computer analysis of two camera views
Prosumer (producing consumer)-based desktop additive manufacturing has been enabled by the recent radical reduction in 3-D printer capital costs created by the open-source release of theExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 42 REFERENCES
A Low-Cost Open-Source Metal 3-D Printer
TLDR
This paper reports on the development of a open-source metal 3-D printer that is a combination of a low-cost commercial gas-metal arc welder and a derivative of the Rostock, a deltabot RepRap. Expand
Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.
TLDR
An overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories is provided, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software. Expand
Open-Source 3D-Printable Optics Equipment
TLDR
An open-source optical library, which significantly reduces the costs associated with much optical equipment, while also enabling relatively easily adapted customizable designs. Expand
Building Research Equipment with Free, Open-Source Hardware
TLDR
Theopen-source paradigm is now enabling creation of open-source scientific hardware by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing with open- source microcontrollers running on FOSS. Expand
Bringing crystal structures to reality by three-dimensional printing
The process of converting structural models derived from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments into physical models for the purposes of visualization/communication and collaboration by the useExpand
Foldscope: Origami-Based Paper Microscope
TLDR
An ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes that can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities. Expand
Getting started with open‐hardware: Development and control of microfluidic devices
TLDR
The design and use of a simple module to control a series of PDMS‐based valves based on a low‐cost microprocessor (Teensy) and open‐source software (Arduino) provided a very reproducible platform to perform fluid delivery at the microfluidic scale. Expand
Fabricating low cost and high performance elastomer lenses using hanging droplets.
TLDR
The hanging droplet lens fabrication technique heralds a new paradigm in the manufacture of low cost, high performance optical lenses for the masses and was able to transform an ordinary commercial smartphone camera into a low-cost digital dermascope that can readily visualize microscopic structures on skin such as sweat pores. Expand
A High Performance, Cost-Effective, Open-Source Microscope for Scanning Two-Photon Microscopy that Is Modular and Readily Adaptable
TLDR
An open-source resource for building an upright, highly modular and adaptable two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscope that can be used for in vitro or in vivo applications and to help progress the understanding of the cellular and physiological function of living systems. Expand
Makers: The New Industrial Revolution
If a country wants to remain economically vibrant, it needs to manufacture things. In recent years, however, many nations have become obsessed with making money out of selling services, leaving theExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...