Ontological confusions but not mentalizing abilities predict religious belief, paranormal belief, and belief in supernatural purpose

@article{Lindeman2015OntologicalCB,
  title={Ontological confusions but not mentalizing abilities predict religious belief, paranormal belief, and belief in supernatural purpose},
  author={Marjaana Lindeman and Annika M. Svedholm-H{\"a}kkinen and Jari Olavi Lipsanen},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2015},
  volume={134},
  pages={63-76}
}
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