Ontogeny of nestmate recognition cues in the red carpenter ant (Camponotus floridanus)

@article{Morel2004OntogenyON,
  title={Ontogeny of nestmate recognition cues in the red carpenter ant (Camponotus floridanus)},
  author={Laurence Morel and Robert K. vander Meer and Barry K. Lavine},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={22},
  pages={175-183}
}
SummaryA combination of behavioral and chemical analyses was used to investigate the nature of nestmate recognition cues and the effects of worker age and social experience on these cues in the ant Camponotus floridanus. Five categories of workers were tested: foragers, 5-day old and 0-day old callows, 5-day old and 0-day old naive callows. Bioassays consisted of introductions of dead workers from these categories into their own colonies or into an alien colony after the following treatments: 1… 

Neuronal correlates of nestmate recognition in the carpenter ant, Camponotus floridanus …………………… Neuronale Korrelate der Nestgenossen-Erkennung bei der Rossameise, Camponotus floridanus

This work investigated the template reformation in workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus by masking their antennae with postpharyngeal gland extracts from nestmates or non-nestmates and found a slow (>2 h) adjustment of the template indicates a reformation localized in the central nervous system rather than in chemosensory neurons.

Reformation process of the neuronal template for nestmate-recognition cues in the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus

This work investigated the template reformation in workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus by masking their antennae with postpharyngeal gland extracts from nestmates or non-nestmates, and found a slow adjustment of the template indicates a reformation localized in the central nervous system rather than in chemosensory neurons.

Odor Coding of Nestmate Recognition in the Eusocial Ant Camponotus floridanus

These studies provide direct evidence that the antennae and odorant receptors are necessary for mediating aggression towards non-nestmates and contribute to a long-standing interest in odor coding and the molecular neuroethology of nestmate recognition.

Odor coding of nestmate recognition in the eusocial ant Camponotus floridanus

An aggression-based bioassay incorporating highly selective modulators that target odorant receptor functionality to characterize their role in nestmate recognition in the formicine ant Camponotus floridanus provides direct evidence that odorant receptors are indeed necessary and sufficient for mediating aggression towards non-nestmates.

Nestmate recognition in ants is possible without tactile interaction

It is demonstrated for the first time that the complex multi-component recognition cues can be perceived and discriminated by ants at close range and concluded that contact chemosensilla are not crucial for nestmate recognition since tactile interaction is not necessary.

Ontogenesis of visual and olfactory kin recognition, in the ant Myrmica sabuleti (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

Ant emergence is a long, stereotyped, precarious event which may require the help of congeners, and very young workers confronted with their congeners’ odor on one hand and their congener’s visual aspect on the other hand, somewhat prefer the odor, even if these young ants belong to a species which exclusively uses its vision for navigating.

Nestmate recognition and temporal modulation in the patterns of cuticular hydrocarbons in natural colonies of japanese carpenter antCamponotus japonicus mayr (hymenoptera: formicidae)

Gas chromatography analysis showed that the compositions of cuticular hydrocarbons of foraging workers from different colonies were the same, but the relative proportions of some compounds were colony-specific, and these compounds are likely to function as colonial signatures.

Apparent Dear‐enemy Phenomenon and Environment‐based Recognition Cues in the Ant Leptothorax nylanderi

Experiments in which colonies are transferred from pine sticks into artificial pine or oak nests corroborate the hypothesis that nesting material strongly influences colony odour in L. nylanderi, suggesting that colonies do not defend absolute foraging territories.

Functional subcaste discrimination (foragers and brood-tenders) in the antCamponotus vagus scop.: polymorphism of cuticular hydrocarbon patterns

In the antCamponotus vagus, when selected foragers that had been earlier removed from the foraging arena and brood-tenders that had been earlier removed from the nest were placed together in a
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES

The kin recognition system of carpenter ants (Camponotus spp.)

A hierarchy of importance of cue sources in determining nestmate discrimination in small Camponotus colonies is proposed: Queen discriminators > worker discriminators>environmental cues.

The kin recognition system of carpenter ants (Camponotus spp.)

Though related adult workers did not cooperate preferentially, the biases in antennation and aggression do indicate an ability to discriminate familiar kin from familiar nonkin, which may be employed in other contexts such as the rearing of reproductive brood.

Nestmate recognition cues in laboratory and field colonies ofSolenopsis invicta buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

  • M. Obin
  • Biology
    Journal of Chemical Ecology
  • 2005
Behavioral observations support the conclusion that lab-reared ants were less distinctive than field-collected ants with respect to recognition cues detectable on the cuticle, and Chromatographic and statistical analyses indicate that cuticular hydrocarbon pattern was a poor predictor of laboratory colony response to field colony workers.

The evolution and ontogeny of nestmate recognition in social wasps

In this review, the evidence for nestmate recognition ability in social wasps is summarized, and the mechanism of female-female nestmates recognition using primitively eusocial wasps (Polistes) as a model is examined.

Nestmate recognition and incompatibility between colonies of the acacia-ant Pseudomyrmex ferruginea

  • A. Mintzer
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
Compatibility between workers of 21 different colonies of the acacia-ant Pseudomyrmex ferruginea was examined, and the absence of antagonistic reactions between workers reared in the different groups indicates that the reproductive females are not the direct source of colony recognition pheromones.

Nestmate and Kin Recognition in Interspecific Mixed Colonies of Ants

The principal mechanism of nestmate recognition in carpenter ants (Camponotus) appears to be odor labels or "discriminators" that originate from the queen and are distributed among, and learned by, all adult colony members.

Nestmate recognition in honey bees

  • M. Breed
  • Psychology, Biology
    Animal Behaviour
  • 1983