Ontogeny of head and caudal fin shape of an apex marine predator: The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier)

@article{Fu2016OntogenyOH,
  title={Ontogeny of head and caudal fin shape of an apex marine predator: The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier)},
  author={Amy L. Fu and Neil Hammerschlag and George V. Lauder and Cheryl A. D. Wilga and Chi‐Yun Kuo and Duncan J. Irschick},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2016},
  volume={277}
}
How morphology changes with size can have profound effects on the life history and ecology of an animal. For apex predators that can impact higher level ecosystem processes, such changes may have consequences for other species. Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) are an apex predator in tropical seas, and, as adults, are highly migratory. However, little is known about ontogenetic changes in their body form, especially in relation to two aspects of shape that influence locomotion (caudal fin) and… 
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