Only distance matters – non-choosy females in a poison frog population

@article{Meuche2013OnlyDM,
  title={Only distance matters – non-choosy females in a poison frog population},
  author={Ivonne Meuche and Oscar Brusa and Karl Eduard Linsenmair and Alexander Keller and Heike Pr{\"o}hl},
  journal={Frontiers in Zoology},
  year={2013},
  volume={10},
  pages={29 - 29}
}
BackgroundFemales have often been shown to exhibit preferences for certain male traits. However, little is known about behavioural rules females use when searching for mates in their natural habitat. We investigated mate sampling tactics and related costs in the territorial strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) possessing a lek-like mating system, where both sequential and simultaneous sampling might occur. We continuously monitored the sampling pattern and behaviour of females during the… Expand
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