Online social networks: why we disclose

@article{Krasnova2010OnlineSN,
  title={Online social networks: why we disclose},
  author={Hanna Krasnova and Sarah Spiekermann and Ksenia Koroleva and Thomas Hildebrand},
  journal={Journal of Information Technology},
  year={2010},
  volume={25},
  pages={109-125}
}
On online social networks such as Facebook, massive self-disclosure by users has attracted the attention of industry players and policymakers worldwide. [...] Key Result Based on these findings, we offer recommendations for network providers.Expand
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