• Corpus ID: 119637506

One-sided Duo rings are McCoy

@article{Cary2015OnesidedDR,
  title={One-sided Duo rings are McCoy},
  author={Michael Cary},
  journal={arXiv: Rings and Algebras},
  year={2015}
}
  • Michael Cary
  • Published 2 December 2015
  • Mathematics
  • arXiv: Rings and Algebras
In this paper we prove that one-sided Duo rings are (two-sided) McCoy. By doing so, we are then able to explicitly describe some of these ring element annihilators of polynomials in McCoy rings. We conclude the paper by showing the place of these results in the literature by way of an extension of a convenient diagram from a paper by Camillo and Nielsen. 

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We continue the study of the McCoy ring property through examining constant annihilators in the ideals of coefficients of zero-dividing polynomials. In the process we introduce the ideal-McCoy

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Rege-Chhawchharia, and Nielsen introduced the concept of right McCoy ring, based on the McCoy's theorem in 1942 for the anni- hilators in polynomial rings over commutative rings. In the present note

Duo, Bézout, and Distributive Rings of Skew Power Series

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On Constant Zero-Divisors of Linear Polynomials

Camillo and Nielsen called a ring R right (linearly) McCoy if given nonzero (linear) polynomials f(x), g(x) over R with f(x)g(x) = 0, there exists a nonzero element r ∈ R with f(x)r = 0. Hong et al.