One hundred years of lung cancer.

@article{Spiro2005OneHY,
  title={One hundred years of lung cancer.},
  author={Stephen G. Spiro and Gerard A. Silvestri},
  journal={American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={172 5},
  pages={
          523-9
        }
}
  • Stephen G. Spiro, Gerard A. Silvestri
  • Published 2005
  • Medicine
  • American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
  • A hundred years ago, lung cancer was a reportable disease, and it is now the commonest cause of death from cancer in both men and women in the developed world, and before long, will reach that level in the developing world as well. The disease has no particular symptoms or signs for its detection at an early stage. Most patients therefore present with advanced stage IIIB or IV disease. Screening tests began in the 1950s with annual chest x-ray films and sputum cytology but they resulted in no… CONTINUE READING

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