Once upon a virus : AIDS legends and vernacular risk perception

@article{Goldstein2009OnceUA,
  title={Once upon a virus : AIDS legends and vernacular risk perception},
  author={D. Goldstein},
  journal={Journal of American Folklore},
  year={2009},
  volume={122},
  pages={102}
}
  • D. Goldstein
  • Published 2009
  • Psychology
  • Journal of American Folklore
Contemporary, or "urban," legends express culturally complex attitudes toward health and illness. Notions of who gets AIDS, how and why, indicate broad issues involving health beliefs, needs, care, and policy. 
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