On the trail of a cereal killer: Exploring the biology of Magnaporthe grisea.

@article{Talbot2003OnTT,
  title={On the trail of a cereal killer: Exploring the biology of Magnaporthe grisea.},
  author={Nicholas J. Talbot},
  journal={Annual review of microbiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={57},
  pages={
          177-202
        }
}
  • N. Talbot
  • Published 28 November 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of microbiology
The blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea causes a serious disease on a wide variety of grasses including rice, wheat, and barley. Rice blast is the most serious disease of cultivated rice and therefore poses a threat to the world's most important food security crop. Here, I review recent progress toward understanding the molecular biology of plant infection by M. grisea, which involves development of a specialized cell, the appressorium. This dome-shaped cell generates enormous turgor pressure and… 

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