On the song resumption, polyterritorial behaviour and their population context in the Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus

@article{Zajc2007OnTS,
  title={On the song resumption, polyterritorial behaviour and their population context in the Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus},
  author={T. Zając and W. Bielański and W. Solarz},
  journal={Journal of Ornithology},
  year={2007},
  volume={149},
  pages={49-57}
}
Mating tactics in species with facultative polygyny seem to be very flexible and to depend on local environmental conditions. We analysed the habitat and population contexts of territorial behaviour, associated with polygyny, in a population of Sedge Warblers Acrocephalus schoenobaenus inhabiting natural wetlands. Nearly one-third of all breeding males (46 individuals) resumed song after completing their mating with the first female, in order to attract another one. Resuming males were usually… Expand

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