On the similarity between syntax and actions

@article{Moro2014OnTS,
  title={On the similarity between syntax and actions},
  author={Andrea Moro},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={18},
  pages={109-110}
}
  • A. Moro
  • Published 1 March 2014
  • Computer Science
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
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