On the origin of stellar masses

@article{Krumholz2011OnTO,
  title={On the origin of stellar masses},
  author={M. Krumholz},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={743},
  pages={110}
}
  • M. Krumholz
  • Published 2011
  • Physics
  • The Astrophysical Journal
  • It has been a longstanding problem to determine, as far as possible, the characteristic masses of stars in terms of fundamental constants; the almost complete invariance of this mass as a function of the star-forming environment suggests that this should be possible. Here I provide such a calculation. The typical stellar mass is set by the characteristic fragment mass in a star-forming cloud, which depends on the cloud's density and temperature structure. Except in the very early universe, the… CONTINUE READING
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