On the origin of high growth rates in archosaurs and their ancient relatives: Complementary histological studies on Triassic archosauriforms and the problem of a “phylogenetic signal” in bone histology

@article{Ricqls2008OnTO,
  title={On the origin of high growth rates in archosaurs and their ancient relatives: Complementary histological studies on Triassic archosauriforms and the problem of a “phylogenetic signal” in bone histology},
  author={Armand J. de Ricql{\`e}s and Kevin Padian and Fabien Knoll and John R. Horner},
  journal={Annales De Paleontologie},
  year={2008},
  volume={94},
  pages={57-76}
}
The craniomandibular anatomy of the early archosauriform Euparkeria capensis and the dawn of the archosaur skull
TLDR
The skull of Euparkeria epitomizes a major evolutionary transition, and places crown Archosaur morphology in an evolutionary context, corresponding to increases in brain size, visual sensitivity, upright locomotion and metabolism around this point in archosauriform evolution.
The osteology and relationships of Vancleavea campi (Reptilia: Archosauriformes)
TLDR
Vancleavea campi from the Late Triassic of western North America, represents the latest surviving non-archosaurian archosauriform known to date and is found to be more closely related to Archosauria than both Erythrosuchus and Proterosuchus, but outside of the crown group.
First palaeohistological inference of resting metabolic rate in an extinct synapsid, Moghreberia nmachouensis (Therapsida: Anomodontia)
TLDR
The first quantitative inferences of resting metabolic rates on fossil synapsids are performed using quantitative histology (size, shape and density of osteocyte lacunae) combined with phylogenetic eigenvector maps and optimization of these inferences allowed us to better constrain the temporal and phylogenetic frames of the acquisition of mammalian endothermy.
First and most northern occurrence of a thalattosuchian crocodylomorph from the Jurassic of the Isle of Skye, Scotland
The Jurassic was a key interval for the evolution of dinosaurs, crocodylomorphs and many other vertebrate groups. In recent years, new vertebrate fossils have emerged from the Early–Middle Jurassic
Long Bone Histology of Sauropterygia from the Lower Muschelkalk of the Germanic Basin Provides Unexpected Implications for Phylogeny
TLDR
The presence of fibrolamellar bone, which is accompanied with increased growth rates and presumably even with increased metabolic rates, already in Anarosaurus and Cymatosaurus can explain the success of the Pistosauroidea, the only sauropterygian group to survive into the Jurassic and give rise to the pelagic plesiosaur radiation.
New insights from bone microanatomy of the Late Triassic Hyperodapedon (Archosauromorpha, Rhynchosauria): implications for archosauromorph growth strategy
Bone microanatomy of multiple postcranial skeletal elements of several individuals of Hyperodapedon collected from India is reported. This reveals that fibrolamellar bone tissue is predominant in the
The problem of dinosaur origins: integrating three approaches to the rise of Dinosauria
  • K. Padian
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh
  • 2012
ABSTRACT The problem of the origin of dinosaurs has historically had three dimensions. The first is the question of whether Dinosauria is monophyletic, and of its relationships to other archosaurs.
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