On the origin of cattle: How aurochs became cattle and colonized the world

@article{AjmoneMarsan2010OnTO,
  title={On the origin of cattle: How aurochs became cattle and colonized the world},
  author={P. Ajmone-Marsan and Jos{\'e} Fernando Garcia and J. Lenstra},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2010},
  volume={19}
}
Since their domestication in the Neolithic, cattle have belonged to our cultural heritage. The reconstruction of their history is an active field of research 1 that contributes to our understanding of human history. Archeological data are now supplemented by analyses of modern and ancient samples of cattle with DNA markers of maternal, paternal, or autosomal inheritance. The most recent genetic data suggest that maternal lineages of taurine cattle originated in the Fertile Crescent with a… Expand
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