On the origin, homologies and evolution of primate facial muscles, with a particular focus on hominoids and a suggested unifying nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia

@article{Diogo2009OnTO,
  title={On the origin, homologies and evolution of primate facial muscles, with a particular focus on hominoids and a suggested unifying nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia},
  author={R. Diogo and B. Wood and M. Aziz and A. Burrows},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2009},
  volume={215}
}
The mammalian facial muscles are a subgroup of hyoid muscles (i.e. muscles innervated by cranial nerve VII). They are usually attached to freely movable skin and are responsible for facial expressions. In this study we provide an account of the origin, homologies and evolution of the primate facial muscles, based on dissections of various primate and non‐primate taxa and a review of the literature. We provide data not previously reported, including photographs showing in detail the facial… Expand
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