On the organization of bioinformatics core services in biology-based research institutes

@article{Kallioniemi2011OnTO,
  title={On the organization of bioinformatics core services in biology-based research institutes},
  author={Olli-P. Kallioniemi and Lodewyk F. A. Wessels and Alfonso Valencia},
  journal={Bioinformatics},
  year={2011},
  volume={27 10},
  pages={
          1345
        }
}
With the growth of genomics, research institutes are increasingly confronted with the task of providing computational support to biologists and the provision of computational facilities, both for laboratory-based bioinformaticians and bioinformatics research groups. The optimal organization of bioinformatics support units to meet these needs is a common topic of discussion and consideration. During the recent evaluation of a bioinformatics core facility, we ended up discussing—in general terms… Expand
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