On the nature of consonant/vowel differences in letter position coding: Evidence from developing and adult readers.

Abstract

In skilled adult readers, transposed-letter effects (jugde-JUDGE) are greater for consonant than for vowel transpositions. These differences are often attributed to phonological rather than orthographic processing. To examine this issue, we employed a scenario in which phonological involvement varies as a function of reading experience: A masked priming lexical decision task with 50-ms primes in adult and developing readers. Indeed, masked phonological priming at this prime duration has been consistently reported in adults, but not in developing readers (Davis, Castles, & Iakovidis, 1998). Thus, if consonant/vowel asymmetries in letter position coding with adults are due to phonological influences, transposed-letter priming should occur for both consonant and vowel transpositions in developing readers. Results with adults (Experiment 1) replicated the usual consonant/vowel asymmetry in transposed-letter priming. In contrast, no signs of an asymmetry were found with developing readers (Experiments 2-3). However, Experiments 1-3 did not directly test the existence of phonological involvement. To study this question, Experiment 4 manipulated the phonological prime-target relationship in developing readers. As expected, we found no signs of masked phonological priming. Thus, the present data favour an interpretation of the consonant/vowel dissociation in letter position coding as due to phonological rather than orthographic processing.

DOI: 10.1111/bjop.12179

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Cite this paper

@article{Comesaa2016OnTN, title={On the nature of consonant/vowel differences in letter position coding: Evidence from developing and adult readers.}, author={Montserrat Comesa{\~n}a and Ana Paula Soares and Ana Marcet and Manuel Perea}, journal={British journal of psychology}, year={2016}, volume={107 4}, pages={651-674} }