On the lack of a universal pattern associated with mammalian domestication: differences in skull growth trajectories across phylogeny

@article{SnchezVillagra2017OnTL,
  title={On the lack of a universal pattern associated with mammalian domestication: differences in skull growth trajectories across phylogeny},
  author={Marcelo R. S{\'a}nchez-Villagra and Valentina Segura and Madeleine Geiger and Laura Heck and Kristof Veitschegger and David A. Flores},
  journal={Royal Society Open Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={4}
}
As shown in a taxonomically broad study, domestication modifies postnatal growth. Skull shape across 1128 individuals was characterized by 14 linear measurements, comparing 13 pairs of wild versus domesticated forms. Among wild forms, the boar, the rabbit and the wolf have the highest proportion of allometric growth, explaining in part the great morphological diversity of the domesticated forms of these species. Wild forms exhibit more isometric growth than their domesticated counterparts… 

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