• Corpus ID: 147084663

On the invention of money: notes on sex, adventure, monomaniacal sociopathy, and the true function of economics

@inproceedings{Graeber2011OnTI,
  title={On the invention of money: notes on sex, adventure, monomaniacal sociopathy, and the true function of economics},
  author={David A. Graeber},
  year={2011}
}
Last week, Robert F. Murphy published a piece on the webpage of the Von Mises Institute responding to some points I made in a recent interview on Naked Capitalism, where I mentioned that the standard economic accounts of the emergence of money from barter appears to be wildly wrong. Since this contradicted a position taken by one of the gods of the Austrian pantheon, the 19th century economist Carl Menger, Murphy apparently felt honor-bound to respond. 

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