On the feedback of stratospheric clouds on polar climate

@inproceedings{KirkDavidoff2002OnTF,
  title={On the feedback of stratospheric clouds on polar climate},
  author={Daniel Kirk-Davidoff and Daniel P. Schrag and J. G. Anderson},
  year={2002}
}
[1] Past climates, such as the Eocene (55 - 38 Ma), experienced dramatically warmer polar winters. Global climate models run with Eocene-like boundary conditions have under-predicted polar temperatures, a discrepancy which has stimulated a recent hypothesis that polar stratospheric clouds may have been important. We propose that such clouds form in response to higher CO 2 via changes in stratospheric circulation and water content. We show that the absence of this mechanism from models of Eocene… CONTINUE READING

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