On the feedback of stratospheric clouds on polar climate

@article{KirkDavidoff2002OnTF,
  title={On the feedback of stratospheric clouds on polar climate},
  author={D. Kirk-Davidoff and D. Schrag and J. Anderson},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2002},
  volume={29},
  pages={51-1-51-4}
}
  • D. Kirk-Davidoff, D. Schrag, J. Anderson
  • Published 2002
  • Geology
  • Geophysical Research Letters
  • [1] Past climates, such as the Eocene (55 - 38 Ma), experienced dramatically warmer polar winters. Global climate models run with Eocene-like boundary conditions have under-predicted polar temperatures, a discrepancy which has stimulated a recent hypothesis that polar stratospheric clouds may have been important. We propose that such clouds form in response to higher CO 2 via changes in stratospheric circulation and water content. We show that the absence of this mechanism from models of Eocene… CONTINUE READING
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