On the evolution of extreme structures: static scaling and the function of sexually selected signals

@article{OBrien2018OnTE,
  title={On the evolution of extreme structures: static scaling and the function of sexually selected signals},
  author={Devin M. O'Brien and Cerisse E Allen and Melissa J. Van Kleeck and David W. E. Hone and Robert J. Knell and Andrew Knapp and Stuart Christiansen and Douglas J. Emlen},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2018},
  volume={144},
  pages={95-108}
}
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