On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

@article{Coelho2008OnTE,
  title={On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola},
  author={Margarida C. Coelho and Fernando Sequeira and Donata Luiselli and Sandra Beleza and Jorge Rocha},
  journal={BMC Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={9},
  pages={80 - 80}
}
BackgroundCurrent information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyaneka-Nkumbi and… Expand
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