On the difference between strength-based and frequency-based mirror effects in recognition memory.

@article{Stretch1998OnTD,
  title={On the difference between strength-based and frequency-based mirror effects in recognition memory.},
  author={V. Stretch and J. Wixted},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={1998},
  volume={24 6},
  pages={
          1379-96
        }
}
  • V. Stretch, J. Wixted
  • Published 1998
  • Medicine
  • Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
A mirror effect can be produced by manipulating word class (e.g., high vs. low frequency) or by manipulating strength (e.g., short vs. long study time). The results of 5 experiments reported here suggest that a strength-based mirror effect is caused by a shift in the location of the decision criterion, whereas a frequency-based mirror effect occurs although the criterion remains fixed with respect to word frequency. Evidence supporting these claims is provided by a series of studies in which… Expand
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