On the cost of searching for a mate in female pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca

@article{Slagsvold1988OnTC,
  title={On the cost of searching for a mate in female pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca
},
  author={Tore Slagsvold and Jan T. Lifjeld and Geir Stenmark and Torgrim Breiehagen},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1988},
  volume={36},
  pages={433-442}
}
Abstract Female pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca , were trapped in one area and released in another a few kilometres away, where the positions of all available nest sites and males were known beforehand. Many of the females moved only a short distance before mating, settling after about 2 (0–6) days in early spring and about 1 day later on. The length of the premating period was negatively correlated with female body weight and prevailing air temperature, indicating that the females were… Expand
Mate sampling behaviour of female pied flycatchers: evidence for active mate choice
TLDR
Major new evidence for active mate choice of female pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca is presented, with females visiting males most frequently in the morning, and the diurnal distribution of visits was significantly correlated with male song activity. Expand
Male arrival and female mate choice in Pied Flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca in Central Spain
TLDR
A second test based on the between-year dispersal tendencies of adult females and their presumed mating 'decisions' revealed a central role of site-tenacity in female choice, with variation in a secondary sexual character, the male's white patch in the forehead, also being important for pairing success. Expand
Random settlement of female pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca: significance of male territory size
TLDR
The results suggest that male pied flycatchers defend territories to gain access to females, and are consistent with an hypothesis of random female settlement where females arrive randomly in relation to area and mate with the first male they encounter. Expand
Competition for a mate restricts mate search of female pied flycatchers
TLDR
The mate sampling behaviour of female pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca, in a 40-ha area containing 10–12 unmated males whose nestboxes were monitored with videocameras found that females that experienced a high level of competition had a more restricted mate search than females that experience a low level of Competition. Expand
Polygyny in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca: a test of the deception hypothesis
TLDR
The deception hypothesis was not supported by the data, and the reduced reproductive success of secondary females may be explained by the cost of searching for a mate. Expand
Mate Sampling and Assessment Procedures in Female Pied Flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca)
TLDR
Models of mate sampling strategies predict that choosiness should decrease throughout the breeding season due to increasing costs of delaying mating, but contrary to the prediction, the observed numbers of males sampled by the searching females increased with time, i.e. late arriving females visited more males than early arrivers. Expand
Predation favours cryptic coloration in breeding male pied flycatchers
TLDR
The data suggest a cost associated with conspicuous coloration in male pied flycatchers, and support the view that predation may help explain sexual dimorphism in bird coloration, delayed plumage maturation, and why males inspecies with less male parental care are more colourful than males in species with moremale parental care. Expand
An estimate of female mate searching costs in the lekking butterfly Coenonympha pamphilus
TLDR
The cost to females of the lekking butterfly Coenonympha pamphilus of visiting males on leks instead of taking off and soliciting courtship from males passing them outside leks, as occurs in the non-lekking congener C. tullia, is larger than has been reported earlier, but is probably too small to eliminate the possibility of indirect benefits of mating with males onLeks. Expand
Female-female aggression explains polyterritoriality in male pied flycatchers
Abstract Many male pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca , try to attract a second mate in a distant territory around the time their initial mate lays her clutch. In this study their success atExpand
Mate fidelity of renesting pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca in relation to characteristics of the pair mates
TLDR
Females in good condition showed a greater tendency to break the pair bond, and moved longer distances for renesting, than females in poor condition, and some evidence was found that male parental quality was correlated with male attractiveness. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 22 REFERENCES
The function of courtship feeding during incubation in the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
Results of a nest predation experiment, forcing birds to re-nest, did not support the hypothesis that courtship feeding strengthens the bond between the sexes, and there was no evidence that the rate of Courtship feeding is a reliable indicator of the quality of male parental care. Expand
Birth area fidelity and age at first breeding in a northern population of Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
Out of 6459 ringed Pied Flycatcher nestlings that fledged, 68 (38 males and 30 females) were retrapped when breeding in the study area in later years; most of the remaining birds were first retrapping when 2 yr old. Expand
Allocation of incubation feeding in a polygynous mating system: a study on pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The pattern of investment by polygynous males was unrelated to the time-lag between completion of the different clutches and to any difference in clutch size, and the reduction in the delivery rate to polygynously mated females had a negative effect on their incubation efficiency. Expand
Why do pied flycatcher females mate with already-mated males?
TLDR
It is suggested that males, by being polyterritorial, deceive females into accepting polygyny; and females can be deceived since they do not have time to find out the marital status of males. Expand
Polygyny and nest site selection in the pied flycatcher
TLDR
The results indicate that male mating success should be closely dependent on the male's ability to monopolize attractive nest sites. Expand
Plumage colour and sexual selection in the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
A new explanation is proposed: a bright colour serves to signal presence and thereby reduces territory holding costs in pied flycatchers, and thus will not benefit as much by being conspicuous as do the black-and-white males that arrive earlier in spring. Expand
Nest site settlement by the Pied Flycatcher: does the female choose her mate for the quality of his house or himself?
Here I report the results of nine field experiments with nestboxes made at Trondheim, Norway, during a three year period. By manipulating the positions of nestboxes (i.e. their attractiveness) afterExpand
Individual variation in Seasonal Breeding Success of Pied Flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca).
(1) We present and analyse reproductive success data from a long term study of the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nesting in the Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire. (2) Our measures of highExpand
Female pied flycatchers choose territory quality and not male characteristics
TLDR
It is found that age, size, plumage colour and song repertoire of males are all uninfluential in female choice, and that territory quality is the single most important criterion. Expand
Female choice selects for extreme tail length in a widowbird
TLDR
It is reported here that males in which the tail was experimentally elongated showed higher mating success than males having normal or reduced tails: males with shortened tails held their territories as long as did other males. Expand
...
1
2
3
...