On the change of population fitness by natural selection2 3

@article{Kimura1958OnTC,
  title={On the change of population fitness by natural selection2 3},
  author={Motoo Kimura},
  journal={Heredity},
  year={1958},
  volume={12},
  pages={145-167}
}
IN The Origin of Species, Darwin (1859) put forward the view that natural selection, by preserving and accumulating small inherited modifications advantageous to each organism, is continuously effecting the improvement of the species in relation to its organic and inorganic environment. At that time the mechanism of particulate inheritance was unknown and he could not reject the theory of blending inheritance nor even the inheritance of acquired characters. Nevertheless it is remarkable that he… 
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