On the Trail of the Triskeles: from the McDonald Institute to Archaic Greek Sicily

@article{Wilson2000OnTT,
  title={On the Trail of the Triskeles: from the McDonald Institute to Archaic Greek Sicily},
  author={R.J.A. Wilson},
  journal={Cambridge Archaeological Journal},
  year={2000},
  volume={10},
  pages={35 - 61}
}
  • R. Wilson
  • Published 1 April 2000
  • History
  • Cambridge Archaeological Journal
The McDonald Institute and this journal have adopted as their logo a three-legged symbol, with wings on each heel, known in Graeco-Roman antiquity as the triskeles. The purpose of this article is to explore the meaning of the iconography of this emblem, and to investigate how and why it came to symbolize the islands of both Man and Sicily. It is suggested that the Isle of Man adopted the triskeles in 1266 when the control of the island passed from the Norse kings to Alexander III of Scotland; a… 

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