On the Telescopic Disks of Stars: A Review and Analysis of Stellar Observations from the Early Seventeenth through the Middle Nineteenth Centuries

@article{Graney2011OnTT,
  title={On the Telescopic Disks of Stars: A Review and Analysis of Stellar Observations from the Early Seventeenth through the Middle Nineteenth Centuries},
  author={Christopher M. Graney and Timothy P. Grayson},
  journal={Annals of Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={68},
  pages={351 - 373}
}
Since the dawn of telescopic astronomy astronomers have observed and measured the "spurious" telescopic disks of stars, generally reporting that brighter stars have larger disks than fainter stars. Early observers such as Galileo Galilei interpreted these disks as being the physical bodies of stars; later observers such as William Herschel understood them to be spurious; some, such as Christian Huygens, argued that stars show no disks at all. In the early 19th century George B. Airy produced a… 
An Astronomer Too Excellent: Simon Marius, the Telescope, and the Problem of the Stars During the Copernican Revolution
Simon Marius argued in his 1614 Mundus Iovialis that telescopic observations of stars supported Tycho Brahe over Copernicus. Prior to the advent of the telescope, Brahe’s was a powerful voice against
Stars as the Armies of God: Lansbergen's Incorporation of Tycho Brahe's Star-Size Argument into the Copernican Theory
How did a Copernican deal with the 'star size' objection to the Copernican theory articulated by Tycho Brahe (1546-1601)? According to Giovanni Battista Riccioli (1598-1671), a Copernican did so by
Sunspot numbers based on historic records in the 1610s: Early telescopic observations by Simon Marius and others
Hoyt & Schatten (1998) claim that Simon Marius would have observed the sun from 1617 Jun 7 to 1618 Dec 31 (Gregorian calendar) all days, except three short gaps in 1618, but would never have detected
Understand assumptions and know uncertainties: Boscovich and the motion of the Earth
The general prohibition of books advocating heliocentric theory put many progressive Jesuits in a difficult position. One of the most prominent Jesuit scientists of the 18th century, Rogerius
The Work of the Best and Greatest Artist: A Forgotten Story of Religion, Science, and Stars in the Copernican Revolution
IN 1576 THE ENGLISH ASTRONOMER Thomas Digges (1546-95) published his English translation of Nicholaus Copernicus's (1473-1543) De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium together with a sketch of the
A new vision for 3D experiments on flow in porous media
The thesis concerns experimental work in the context of flow in porous media, a multi-disciplinary field coupling such topics as fluid dynamics, emergence, statistical mechanics and percolation
An Earth-centered cosmos: astronomy and cosmology from
  • Physics
    Finding our Place in the Solar System
  • 2019
Confirming Copernicus: evidence for Earth’s motions
  • Physics
    Finding our Place in the Solar System
  • 2019
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-7 OF 7 REFERENCES
Galileo's observations of Neptune
The planet Neptune was discovered in 1846. As its period of revolution is almost 165 years, Neptune has not yet completed one revolution since its discovery. Largely as a result of this, its orbit is
358 5. Confusion regarding Airy's work: spurious disks and tiny points
Almagestum Novum, I (Bologna, 1651)
Dissertatio de Mercurio in Sole Viso (Lieden, 1633)
Mercurius in Sole Visus Gedani (Gdań sk, 1662)