On the Structure of the Antennular Attachment Organ of the Cypris Larva of Balanus balanoides (L.)

@article{Nott1969OnTS,
  title={On the Structure of the Antennular Attachment Organ of the Cypris Larva of Balanus balanoides (L.)},
  author={James A. Nott and Brian A. Foster},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B},
  year={1969},
  volume={256},
  pages={115-134}
}
  • J. NottB. Foster
  • Published 25 September 1969
  • Biology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
The third segment of the antennule of the cypris larva of Balanus balanoides is modified as an attachment organ with a disk by which the cyprid attaches to submerged surfaces. The attachment disk is covered with a felt of fine cuticular villi. Opening on to the disk are terminal branches of the cement duct, numerous glands and an array of sensory hairs. The sensory structures are arthropod scolopidia with the dendrites giving rise to cilia which, distally, change to distal sensory processes. It… 

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