On the Role of Fire in Neandertal Adaptations in Western Europe: Evidence from Pech de l'Azé and Roc de Marsal, France

@article{Sandgathe2011OnTR,
  title={On the Role of Fire in Neandertal Adaptations in Western Europe: Evidence from Pech de l'Az{\'e} and Roc de Marsal, France},
  author={Dennis M Sandgathe and H. Dibble and P. Goldberg and S. McPherron and A. Turq and L. Niven and J. Hodgkins},
  journal={Paleoanthropology},
  year={2011},
  volume={2011},
  pages={216-242}
}
Though the earliest evidence for the use of fire is a subject of debate, it is clear that by the late Middle Paleolithic, Neandertals in southwest France were able to use fire. The archaeological record of fire use in this place and time is, however, quite patchy. While there are a growing number of sites with impressive evidence for fire use, there are also a much larger number of sites without such evidence. Based primarily on evidence from two recently excavated well-stratified Middle… Expand
Geochemical Evidence for the Control of Fire by Middle Palaeolithic Hominins
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