On the Relations among Priming, Conscious Recollection, and Intentional Retrieval: Evidence from Neuroimaging Research

@article{Schacter1998OnTR,
  title={On the Relations among Priming, Conscious Recollection, and Intentional Retrieval: Evidence from Neuroimaging Research},
  author={Daniel L. Schacter and Randy L. Buckner},
  journal={Neurobiology of Learning and Memory},
  year={1998},
  volume={70},
  pages={284-303}
}
Neurobiological distinctions among forms of memory have been investigated mainly from the perspective of lesion studies in nonhuman animals and experiments with human neurological patients. We consider recent neuroimaging studies of healthy human volunteers using positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that provide new information concerning the neural correlates of particular forms of memory retrieval. More specifically, we consider evidence… 

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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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