On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects

@article{Sibly2005OnTR,
  title={On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects},
  author={Richard M. Sibly and Daniel Barker and Michael C. Denham and Jim Hone and Mark Pagel},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={309},
  pages={607 - 610}
}
A key unresolved question in population ecology concerns the relationship between a population's size and its growth rate. We estimated this relationship for 1780 time series of mammals, birds, fish, and insects. We found that rates of population growth are high at low population densities but, contrary to previous predictions, decline rapidly with increasing population size and then flatten out, for all four taxa. This produces a strongly concave relationship between a population's growth rate… 

On the stability of populations of mammals, birds, fish and insects.

In a study of 634 populations of mammals, birds, fish and insects, it is found that most can be expected to remain stable despite year to year fluctuations caused by environmental factors.

Comment on "On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects" III

Time series suggest that populations of large-bodied animals underfill their environments because they measure strength of density compensation, which is consistent with slower responses in ascent than descent toward carrying capacity.

Response to Comment on "On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects"

Our conclusions are unaffected by removal of the time series identified by Peacock and Garshelis as harvest data. The relationship between a population's growth rate and its size is generally concave

Comment on "On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects" IV

Sibly et al.'s contention that density dependence acts strongly on low-density animal populations irrespective of body size contradicts many long-term studies of large mammals.

Comment on "On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects" I

It is argued that the authors confused discrete and continuous models, that their best-fit models cannot explain observed oscillations, and that their estimation procedures appear biased.

Comment on "On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects" II

  • J. Ross
  • Environmental Science
    Science
  • 2006
It is explained why some aspects of their analysis are questionable and, therefore, why their results and estimation procedure should be used with care.

Genetic diversity affects the strength of population regulation in a marine fish.

The results suggest that the genetic and phenotypic composition of populations can play a major role in their dynamics, and Mechanisms that contributed to this pattern include links between genetic diversity, habitat use, and spatial crowding.

Genetic diversity affects the strength of population regulation in a marine fish

Variation is an essential feature of biological populations, yet much of ecological theory treats individuals as though they are identical. This simplifying assumption is often justified by the

Evidence for the buffer effect operating in multiple species at a national scale

Habitat-specific population trends for 85 bird species from long-term national monitoring data are used and it is found that both patterns of population change and changes in habitat preference are consistent with the predictions of the buffer effect, providing support for its widespread operation.

Response to Comments on "On the Regulation of Populations of Mammals, Birds, Fish, and Insects"

The technical comments by Getz and Lloyd-Smith, Ross, and Doncaster focus on specific aspects of our analysis and estimation and do not demonstrate any results opposing our key conclusion—that,
...

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