On the Possibility of Classical Client Blind Quantum Computing

@article{Cojocaru2021OnTP,
  title={On the Possibility of Classical Client Blind Quantum Computing},
  author={Alexandru Cojocaru and L{\'e}o Colisson and Elham Kashefi and Petros Wallden},
  journal={Cryptogr.},
  year={2021},
  volume={5},
  pages={3}
}
We define the functionality of delegated pseudo-secret random qubit generator (PSRQG), where a classical client can instruct the preparation of a sequence of random qubits at some distant party. Their classical description is (computationally) unknown to any other party (including the distant party preparing them) but known to the client. We emphasize the unique feature that no quantum communication is required to implement PSRQG. This enables classical clients to perform a class of quantum… 
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