On the Occurrence Rate of Hot Jupiters in Different Stellar Environments

@article{Wang2014OnTO,
  title={On the Occurrence Rate of Hot Jupiters in Different Stellar Environments},
  author={Ji Wang and D. Fischer and E. Horch and Xu Huang},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2014},
  volume={799},
  pages={229}
}
Many hot Jupiters (HJs) are detected by the Doppler and transit techniques. From surveys using these two techniques, however, the measured HJ occurrence rates differ by a factor of two or more. Using the California Planet Survey sample and the Kepler sample, we investigate the causes for this difference in the HJ occurrence rate. First, we find that 12.8% ± 0.24% of HJs are misidentified in the Kepler mission because of photometric dilution and subgiant contamination. Second, we explore the… Expand

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