On the Mechanical Implications of the Avian Skull and Their Bearing on the Evolution and Classification of Birds

@article{Simonetta1960OnTM,
  title={On the Mechanical Implications of the Avian Skull and Their Bearing on the Evolution and Classification of Birds},
  author={Alberto Mario Simonetta},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1960},
  volume={35},
  pages={206 - 220}
}
  • A. Simonetta
  • Published 1 September 1960
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
Preliminary investigations dealing with the relationship existing between the morphology of the bird's skull and its kinetic possibilities, appear to show that the thecodont ancestors of Birds, as well as Archaeopteryx were almost certainly akinetic. Kinetism developed early, but at least in some measure independently in the various avian orders. The amount of kinetic movement possible appears to be related to several morphological features, such as the structure of the palate, the relationship… 
The skull of a relative of the stem-group bird Mononykus
TLDR
The configuration of the temporal region of the skull and its articulation with the rostrum indicate the capability for prokinetic movement in which flexing occurs at the junction of the upper jaw and neurocranium, and support the idea that prokinesis preceded other types of avian intracranial kinesis.
Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds
TLDR
Modeling and developmental experiments indicate that the lateral bar is load‐bearing and suggest that this function was transferred to other bony elements when it was lost in palaeognaths, and it is possible that the loss of the load‐ bearing lateral bar might have constrained diversification of skull morphology in palaiognaths and thus limited taxonomic diversity within the group.
Comparative ossification and development of the skull in palaeognathous birds (Aves: Palaeognathae)
TLDR
This study provides an important first look at the timing and sequence of skull development in palaeognathous birds, providing data that can be compared to better-studied avian systems in order to polarize ontogenetic characters.
A Comparative Morphological Study of the Jugal and Quadratojugal in Early Birds and Their Dinosaurian Relatives
TLDR
A comparative study of the jugal and quadratojugal morphology of basal birds and their close relatives such as dromaeosaurids and oviraptorids elucidates how modern birds has achieved its derived jugal bar morphology, and sheds light on the evolution of the postorbital configuration of birds.
Archaeopteryx and the origin of birds
TLDR
Analysis of the five presently known skeletal specimens of Archaeopteryx confirm the conclusions (long rejected by most subsequent workers) of Heilmann (1926), Lowe (1935, 1944, 1944) and Holmgren (1955), namely, that the skeletal anatomy of Archaeipteryx is extraordinarily similar to that of contemporaneous and succeeding coelurosaurian dinosaurs.
Evolutionary Consequences of Skeletal Differentiation
TLDR
The histology of the skeletal tissues of the Ordovician agnatha is reviewed with the conclusion that the skeletal tissue of the first vertebrates were as diverse and as specialized as are those of present-day vertebrates.
Biomechanics of the jaw apparatus of the gigantic Eocene bird Diatryma: implications for diet and mode of life
Discovery of several new specimens of the gigantic Eocene ground bird Diatryma gigantea from the Willwood Formation of northwestern Wyoming, has prompted an analysis of its feeding apparatus and an
The impact of allometry on vomer shape and its implications for the taxonomy and cranial kinesis of crown-group birds
TLDR
The vomer itself is not a suitable proxy for exploring the evolution of cranial kinesis in crown birds and their ancestors, and the existing correlation between shape and size of the vomer across different bird groups found in the present study questions this conclusion.
Evolution of the vomer and its implications for cranial kinesis in Paraves
TLDR
It is concluded that cranial kinesis evolved relatively late, likely an innovation of the Neognathae, and is linked to the transformation of the vomer, enabling the evolution of a diversity of kinetic mechanisms and ultimately contributing to the extraordinary evolutionary success of this clade.
The kinematics of feeding and drinking in palaeognathous birds in relation to cranial morphology
TLDR
It is concluded that the specific morphology of the PPC is not the result of specific functional demands from palaeognathous feeding behaviour, and the movement patterns are considered very similar to the basic feeding behaviour in neognATHous birds.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 26 REFERENCES
THE ONTOGENY OF THE CRANIAL BONES, CRANIAL PERIPHERAL AND CRANIAL PARASYMPATHETIC NERVES, TOGETHER WITH A STUDY OF THE VISCERAL MUSCLES OF STRUTHIO
TLDR
The premaxillary-vomer arthrosis is present in the embryo of Struthio but is absent in the adult; the trabeculo-capsular entity is uninterrupted: therefore, there is no mesokinetic joint; kinesis, as a result, is limited.
Adaptations for Food-Getting in the American Blackbirds
TLDR
This paper describes first the individual feeding adaptations, then their convergent re-appearance in each of the three major icterid lines, and the nature of the adaptations themselves.
Uber eine Rekonstruktion des Schadels von Archaeornis siemensis Dames 1884 im Naturhistorische Museum, Braunschweig
  • Acta X Congr. Internat. Ornithologici (1950), pp. 631-635.
  • 1951
On certain debatable questions in cranioskeletal
  • 1941
DIE GAUMENLÜCKEN DER VÖGEL
Some aspects of the kinetic in the jaws of birds
  • Wilson Bull
  • 1955
...
...