On the Meaning of Words and Dinosaur Bones: Lexical Knowledge Without a Lexicon

@article{Elman2009OnTM,
  title={On the Meaning of Words and Dinosaur Bones: Lexical Knowledge Without a Lexicon},
  author={Jeffrey L. Elman},
  journal={Cognitive science},
  year={2009},
  volume={33 4},
  pages={
          547-582
        }
}
  • J. Elman
  • Published 2009
  • Psychology, Medicine, Computer Science
  • Cognitive science
Although for many years a sharp distinction has been made in language research between rules and words-with primary interest on rules-this distinction is now blurred in many theories. If anything, the focus of attention has shifted in recent years in favor of words. Results from many different areas of language research suggest that the lexicon is representationally rich, that it is the source of much productive behavior, and that lexically-specific information plays a critical and early role… Expand
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