On the Functional Morphology of the Gorgonopsid Skull

@inproceedings{Kemp1969OnTF,
  title={On the Functional Morphology of the Gorgonopsid Skull},
  author={Thomas Kemp},
  year={1969}
}
  • T. Kemp
  • Published 4 September 1969
  • Biology
Cranial material of some gorgonopsids has been prepared by the acetic acid technique. A new species, Leontocephalus intactus , has been made for one of the skulls, and generic and specific diagnoses are presented. On the basis of composite information from all the skulls, some aspects of the functional morphology are discussed. From the form of the dentition and the pattern of tooth-wear, it is deduced that besides a direct closure of the jaws, the lower incisors must have been capable of… 

Figures from this paper

The Primitive Cynodont Procynosuchus: Functional Anatomy of the Skull and Relationships
TLDR
The anatomy of the internal nares indicates that an arrangement of Jacobson’s organ and associated nerves, blood vessels and glands comparable to that of monotremes was present and an attempt is made to interpret its anatomy in functional terms.
The Functional Anatomy of a Permian Dicynodont
TLDR
It is concluded that Dicynodon trigonocephalus was a slow-moving herbivore, nevertheless capable of a sustained locomotory effort and may have avoided predators by crepuscular or cryptic behaviour.
New features of the snout and orbit of a therocephalian therapsid from South Africa
TLDR
The anterior part of the externally poorly preserved skull of a therocephalian from the Karoo Basin in South Africa is described, using the method of serial grinding, and an anteriorly positioned sinus, situated directly behind the canine root, is homologized with the maxillary sinus of gorgonopsians.
NEW DATA ON THE CRANIAL ANATOMY OF LYCAENOPS (SYNAPSIDA, GORGONOPSIDAE), AND REFLECTIONS ON THE POSSIBLE PRESENCE OF STREPTOSTYLY IN GORGONOPSIANS
TLDR
Study of a skull attributed to Lycaenops angusticeps reveals the presence of a ventral flange of the jugal that supports the transverse flanges of the pterygoid, which may have been selected for improved hearing of air-borne sounds.
Non-Mammalian Synapsids: The Beginning of the Mammal Line
TLDR
The anatomy of the middle ear region of the known sequence of fossil stem-group mammals—pelycosaurs, basal therapsids, and several cynodonts—is reviewed in this chapter and the interpretation offers support for the second view.
The skull of Morganucodon
TLDR
Two species of triconodont (atherian) mammal from the Lower Jurassic are described: M. oehleri from China and M. watsoni from Wales; the systematic position of Morganucodon is discussed.
New therapsid specimens and the origin of the secondary hard and soft palate of mammals
TLDR
Investigation of serial sections of extant marsupials confirm the view that the levator of the velum is derived from the upper constrictor of the pharynx, and the choanal folds and the secondary palate are discussed within the wider framework of the evolutionary biology of mammalian forerunners.
Reassessment of the Morphology and Paleobiology of the Therocephalian Tetracynodon Darti (Therapsida), And The Phylogenetic Relationships of Baurioidea
TLDR
The brain is strikingly plesiomorphic in many features, but generally shows features that are intermediate between gorgonopsians and cynodonts, thus clarifying this stage of the evolution of the synapsid brain.
Whaitsiid Therocephalia and the origin of cynodonts
TLDR
It is argued that the organization of the cynodont skull can be seen as a logical functional development from the more primitive condition, and in particular, the streptostylic nature of the jaw articulation, the enlargement of the dentary and reduction of the postdentary bones, may all be correlated with the development of a masseter muscle.
The Last Labyrinthodont? A New Brachyopoid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Early Jurassic Evergreen Formation of Queensland, Australia
TLDR
The diversity of Australia's brachyopoids, including the presence of the most primitive and earliest-known members of each of the included families, suggests that the superfamily originated in Australia.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES
Tooth replacement in mammal-like reptiles of the suborders gorgonopsia and therocephalia
  • K. Kermack
  • Biology, Medicine
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
  • 1956
TLDR
An investigation of two groups of the more primitive therapsids, the Gorgonopsia and the Therocephalia, which lie close to the main line of synapsid evolution, finds that after a certain time in the animal’s life tooth replacement ceased, the permanent upper canines being always borne by the anterior alveoli.
The Development of the Vertebrate Skull
TLDR
A vast amount of work has been done since on the skull, and no one has made more important contributions than Dr. R. de Beer himself, whose series of detailed studies on the development of the head and skull in various vertebrates from cyclostome to mammal, published from 1922 onwards form the basis for this fine monograph illustrated by 143 plates.
Researches on the Structure, Organization, and Classification of the Fossil Reptilia. VI. On the Anomodont Reptilia and Their Allies
TLDR
The chief contributions to a knowledge of the Anomodont skull have been made by Sir Richard Owen, Professor Huxley, and Professor Cope, who said to show a blending of Chelonian and Lizard structures.
NASAL ANATOMY AND THE PHYLOGENY OF REPTILES
TLDR
The structure and development of the nasal cavities in various recent tetrapods might give some assistance to the phylogeny of the major groups of reptiles, and Nasal anatomy appears to offer some assistance, and is therefore of considerable interest.
On the Structure of the Mammal-Like Reptiles of the Sub-Order Gorgonopsia
Over eighty years ago reptiles with a mammal-like dentition were first discovered in South Africa by Andrew Geddes Bain, and specimens were sent to England in 1853. One of these, a fairly well
Notes on some Whaitsiids and Moschorhinids
TLDR
This paper contains descriptions of five genera and a beautiful and complete skull of a new species, Moschorhinus natalensis, the first specimen of this gt!nus that has the whole of the posterior half of the skull preserved and it is peculiar in that it dates from the Lystrosaurus-zone.
On the Structure of the Skull in the Mammal-Like Reptiles of the Suborder Therocephalia
The first-known mammal-like reptiles were discovered by Andrew Geddes Bain (1845) in the Karroo Beds of South Africa about a hundred years ago. The large majority of the species he discovered belong
On a Collection of Karroo Vertebrates from Tanganyika Territory
  • S. H. Haughton
  • Geology
    Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London
  • 1932
I. Introduction The vertebrate bones described and discussed in this paper are part of a consignment sent for examination by Dr. E. O. Teale, Director of the Tanganyika Geological Survey, and
The Cranial Morphology of a New Gorgonopsian
Cyonosaurus longiceps gen. et sp. nov., a gorgonopsian from the Cistecephalus zone of the Karroo Series, South Africa, is described and figured. The excellent state of preservation of the skull and
A new type of primitive Cynodont
TLDR
A very interesting ancestral type of Cynodont is described in reasonable detail from serial sections, graphical figures, and a complete wax model, four times natural size, on the basis of a specimen thought to be a Scaloposaurus before it was decided to subject it to serial grinding.
...
1
2
3
4
...