On the First Law of Geography: A Reply

@article{Tobler2004OnTF,
  title={On the First Law of Geography: A Reply},
  author={Waldo Tobler},
  journal={Annals of the Association of American Geographers},
  year={2004},
  volume={94},
  pages={304 - 310}
}
  • W. Tobler
  • Published 1 June 2004
  • Economics
  • Annals of the Association of American Geographers
D aniel Sui has sent me a written version of comments presented by five geographers at a panel on the first law of geography organized by him at the 2003 AAG meeting in New Orleans. The comments seem to fall into two camps: some reject the idea of ‘‘laws’’ in geography, and others feel that my notion has been of some merit. Interestingly, several other laws are cited in the comments; two by Isaac Newton (gravity, motion), two additional ‘‘first’’ laws (ecology, social science), four additional… 

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