On the Feasibility of Perfect Resilience with Local Fast Failover

@inproceedings{Foerster2021OnTF,
  title={On the Feasibility of Perfect Resilience with Local Fast Failover},
  author={Klaus-Tycho Foerster and Juho Hirvonen and Yvonne Anne Pignolet and Stefan Schmid and Gilles Tr{\'e}dan},
  booktitle={APOCS},
  year={2021}
}
In order to provide a high resilience and to react quickly to link failures, modern computer networks support fully decentralized flow rerouting, also known as local fast failover. In a nutshell, the task of a local fast failover algorithm is to pre-define fast failover rules for each node using locally available information only. These rules determine for each incoming link from which a packet may arrive and the set of local link failures (i.e., the failed links incident to a node), on which… 

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