On the Determination of Planetary Distances in the Ptolemaic System

@article{Carman2010OnTD,
  title={On the Determination of Planetary Distances in the Ptolemaic System},
  author={Christi{\'a}n C. Carman},
  journal={International Studies in the Philosophy of Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={24},
  pages={257 - 265}
}
  • Christián C. Carman
  • Published 1 September 2010
  • Physics
  • International Studies in the Philosophy of Science
In 1975, Imre Lakatos and Elie Zahar claimed that the determination of planetary distances represents excess empirical content of Copernicus’s theory over that of Ptolemy. This claim provoked an interesting discussion during the first half of the 1980s. The discussion started when Alan Chalmers affirmed that it is not correct to attribute this advantage to the Copernican system over the Ptolemaic. Other scholars criticized Chalmers’s assertion, reaffirming the position of Lakatos and Zahar: one… 
11 Citations
The first Copernican was Copernicus: the difference between Pre-Copernican and Copernican heliocentrism
It is well known that heliocentrism was proposed in ancient times, at least by Aristarchus of Samos. Given that ancient astronomers were perfectly capable of understanding the great advantages of
Scale in Action
  • R. Netz
  • History
    Scale, Space and Canon in Ancient Literary Culture
  • 2020
A Quantitative Model of Ancient Literary Culture
  • Linguistics
    Scale, Space and Canon in Ancient Literary Culture
  • 2020
Space in Action
Canon: The Evidence
  • Scale, Space and Canon in Ancient Literary Culture
  • 2020
Bibliography
  • Scale, Space and Canon in Ancient Literary Culture
  • 2020
Coda to the Book
  • Scale, Space and Canon in Ancient Literary Culture
  • 2020
Canon in Practice
  • Scale, Space and Canon in Ancient Literary Culture
  • 2020
Space, the Setting
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 18 REFERENCES
PLANETARY DISTANCES AND COPERNICAN THEORY: A REPLY
  • A. Chalmers
  • Physics, Geology
    The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
  • 1983
In the light of Keith Hutchison's hard-hitting and illuminating [1983] criticism of my note on planetary distances in Copernican theory I must reformulate my criticism of Kuhn, Lakatos and Zahar, and
PLANETARY DISTANCES IN COPERNICAN THEORY
  • A. Chalmers
  • Physics
    The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
  • 1981
It is a widely held view that the fact that the radii of planetary orbits can be calculated in the Copernican theory but not in the Ptolemaic theory constitutes an advantage of the former over the
Rounding numbers: Ptolemy’s calculation of the Earth–Sun distance
In this article, I analyze the coincidence of the prediction of the Earth–Sun distance carried out by Ptolemy in his Almagest and the one he carried out, with another method, in the Planetary
Sunspots, Galileo, and the Orbit of the Earth
TOWARD THE END of the sixteenth century, Galileo came to the opinion that the earth was in motion, motion very similar to that proposed by Copernicus some half-century earlier. The problem of
THE SUPERIORITY OF THE COPERNICAN SYSTEM: A REPLY TO CHALMERS
  • Martin V. Curd
  • Physics
    The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
  • 1983
Alan Chalmers [1981] has recently criticised those who claim that the Copernican theory is superior to the Ptolemaic theory because in the former, but not in the latter, one can calculate the
PLANETARY DISTANCES AS A TEST FOR THE COPERNICAN THEORY
  • K. Hutchison
  • Physics
    The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
  • 1983
Second, apart from the factual incorrectness of one of Chalmers' assumptions, the epistemological point he is making is dubious in its own right. Let us assume that there are two astronomical
Could Lakatos, Even With Zahar's Criterion for Novel Fact, Evaluate the Copernican Research Programme?1
  • N. Thomason
  • Physics
    The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
  • 1992
In ‘Why did Copernicus's research programme supersede Ptolemy's?’, Lakatos and Zahar argued that, on Zahar's criterion for ‘novel fact’, Copernican theory was objectively scientifically superior to
A survey of the Almagest
- Forward to the revised edition.- Preface.- The almagest through the ages.- Physics and philosophy in the almagest.- Ptolemy as a mathematician.- Spherical astronomy in the almagest.- The motion of
The Copernican revolution : planetary astronomy in the development of western thought
* Foreword by James Bryant Conant *1. The Ancient Two-Sphere Universe *2. The Problem of the Planets *3. The Two-Sphere Universe in Aristotelian Thought *4. Recasting the Tradition. Aristotle to the
...
...