On the Claims for Discovery of Elements 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, and 118 (IUPAC Technical Report)

@article{Karol2003OnTC,
  title={On the Claims for Discovery of Elements 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, and 118 (IUPAC Technical Report)},
  author={Paul J. Karol and Hirohiko Nakahara and Brian W. Petley and E. Vogt},
  journal={Pure and Applied Chemistry},
  year={2003},
  volume={75},
  pages={1601 - 1611}
}
The IUPAC/IUPAP Joint Working Party on the priority of claims to the discovery of new elements has reviewed the relevant literature pertaining to several claims. In accordance with the criteria for the discovery of elements, previously established by the 1992 IUPAC/IUPAP Transfermium Working Group, and reinforced by the 1999 IUPAC/IUPAP Joint Working Party, it was determined that the claim by the Hofmann et al. research collaboration for the discovery of element 111 at Gesellschaft für… 

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On the discovery of new elements (IUPAC/IUPAP Report)

Abstract Almost thirty years ago the criteria that are currently used to verify claims for the discovery of a new element were set down by the comprehensive work of a Transfermium Working Group, TWG,

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A joint IUPAC–IUPAP Working Party (JWP) confirmed the discovery of the element with atomic number 110. In accord with IUPAC procedures, the discoverers proposed a name and symbol for the element. The

Finding eka-iodine: discovery priority in modern times

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) currently recognizes 111 elements for the modern periodic table (1). The discovery timeline for most of these elements can be traced

Name and symbol of the element with atomic number 111 (IUPAC Recommendations 2004)

A joint IUPAC-IUPAP Working Party (JWP) confirmed the discovery of element number 111. In accord with IUPAC procedures, the discoverers proposed a name and symbol for the element. The Inorganic

Response to 'Discovery of the element with atomic number 112' by Robert C. Barber, Heinz W. Gaggeler, Paul J. Karol, Hiromichi Nakahara, Emanuele Vardaci and Erich Vogt (PAC-REP-08-03-05)

Based on two alpha-particle chains the Joint Working Party (JWP) Report assigns the priority for discovering element 112 to work done in 1996 and 2002 at GSI, Darmstadt. By doing this it ignores the

Transactinide Elements and Future Elements

This chapter gives a brief summary of the reported discoveries, confirmation, and nuclear properties of the claimed and confirmed transactinide elements through the year 2004. However, the primary

NAME AND SYMBOL OF THE ELEMENT WITH ATOMIC NUMBER 111 (IUPAC Provisional Recommendation)

A joint IUPAC-IUPAP Working Party (JWP) has confirmed the discovery of element number 111. In accord with IUPAC procedures, the discoverers have proposed a name and symbol for the element. The

Failed Discovery Claims

The case described in the chapter concerns a failed discovery claim and the announcement in 1999 that a research group in Berkeley had produced element 118 turned out to be based on false data, namely fraud committed by Viktor Ninov, a member of the group.

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The IUPAC/IUPAP joint working party on the priority of claims to the discovery of elements 110, 111, and 112 has reviewed the relevant literature pertaining to the several claims. In accordance with

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