On the Broad Classification of Organisms

@article{Whittaker1959OnTB,
  title={On the Broad Classification of Organisms},
  author={Robert H. Whittaker},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1959},
  volume={34},
  pages={210 - 226}
}
  • R. Whittaker
  • Published 1 September 1959
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
A system of broad classification which recognized a plant kingdom of four divisions and an animal kingdom of ten to fifteen phyla was for many years stable and standardized. Significant changes have occurred, or are now proposed. Among these, three major lines of development are discussed: a. Classification of the algae has been fundamentally revised; seven or more algal series are distinguished primarily by characteristics of cells. The phylum concept, long established in zoological… 

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