On the Antiquity of Agriculture in Ethiopia

@article{Ehret1979OnTA,
  title={On the Antiquity of Agriculture in Ethiopia},
  author={Christopher Ehret},
  journal={The Journal of African History},
  year={1979},
  volume={20},
  pages={161 - 177}
}
  • C. Ehret
  • Published 1 April 1979
  • History, Economics
  • The Journal of African History
From various kinds of evidence it can now be argued that agriculture in Ethiopia and the Horn was quite ancient, originating as much as 7,000 or more years ago, and that its development owed nothing to South Arabian inspiration. Moreover, the inventions of grain cultivation in particular, both in Ethiopia and separately in the Near East, seem rooted in a single, still earlier subsistence invention of North-east Africa, the intensive utilization of wild grains, beginning probably by or before 13… 
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